The Real Truth Behind Artificial Sweetener

The Truth Behind Artificial Sweetener

Do you love to add artificial sweetener to just about anything?  Did you know artificial sweeteners may be linked to diabetes? The next time you add sweetener to your food or drinks you may think twice after learning about the effects of artificial sweeteners.

10222769_sAccording to an article at english.ahram.org.eg, “What Researcher Have Learned about Artificial Sweeteners”

“Using artificial sweeteners may set the stage for diabetes in some people by hampering the way their bodies handle sugar, suggests a preliminary study done mostly in mice.

The authors said they are not recommending any changes in how people use artificial sweeteners based on their study, which included some human experiments.

The researchers and outside experts said more study is needed, while industry groups called the research limited and said other evidence shows sweeteners are safe and useful for weight control.

The study from researchers in Israel was released Wednesday by the journal Nature.

The work suggests the sweeteners change the composition of normal, beneficial bacteria in the gut. That appears to hamper how well the body handles sugar in the diet, which in turn can result in higher blood sugar levels. This impairment, called glucose intolerance, can eventually lead to diabetes.

Some experts who didn’t participate in the work urged caution in interpreting the results. James Hill, an obesity expert at the University of Colorado, called the work good science. Still, overall, “I do not think there is enough data yet to lead to a definitive conclusion about artificial sweeteners and the body’s handling of sugar,” he wrote in an email. “I certainly do not think there is sufficient evidence to conclude that they are harmful.”

But Yanina Pepino of Washington University in St. Louis said the results make a convincing case that sweeteners hamper the body’s handling of sugar by altering gut bacteria. And it adds to her belief that sweeteners and sugar should be used in moderation, especially by children, she said.

“It’s really providing strong data suggesting we need to do more research,” she said.

Researchers began by testing three widely used sweeteners: saccharin, sold for example as Sweet `N Low; sucralose, sold as Splenda, and aspartame, sold for example as NutraSweet, in 20 mice. Some animals got one of those substances in their water, and others got sugar water or just water.” To read the entire article click here.

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